Between Book, File and Artwork

Date:
27.08.2013
Format:
LECTURES
Place:
STRELKA COURTYARD
Language:
english with russian translation

In his last book “Paper Machine” (2005) Jacques Derrida mused on the future of books and saw it in “electronic writing, traveling at top speed from one spot on the globe to another, and linking together, beyond frontiers”. The last evening of Strelka’s ‘Books are in the Air’ programme takes a closer look at this phenomenon, focusing on contemporary publishing practices and e-publishing.

Books and their latest forms and formats were analysed both as objects of digital space, and as objects of artistic and literary speculations. Over the course of three 20-minute video-chat sessions, a panel of speakers discussed topics ranging from books as data and technology, computer generated literature, electronic poetry, and books in contemporary artistic practice.

Zorka Lednarova’s generative animation “Signs and Animation” was projected onto Strelka’s amphitheatre. Lednarova’s world-map is a textual representation of different countries and cultures.

Speakers:

Tan Lin — novelist, poet, filmmaker, professor of creative writing at New Jersey City University. In his works Tan Lin aims to achieve an “ambient” mode of literature that engages sampling, communal production and social networks.

Traumawien (Luc Gross, Julian Palasz and Peter Moosgaard) — publishing group that uses software as the basis for artistic forms of expression in digital literature, researching processual background and programming languages of digital systems.

Katja Novitskova — Estonian artist, based in Amsterdam. At the core of Katja’s works is research on ongoing transfomations of matter, social and informational processes in the present globalised world, through which Novitskova develops personal and collaborative strategies to bring out its evolutionary meanings.

Artist:

Zorka Lednarova — Slovakian media-artist based in Berlin. Zorka’s practice revolves around geopolitical, cutlural and informational struggles caused by globalisation and migration flow.

booksintheair.com